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Resident Handbook

This four week course is scheduled in PGY-4 year of training, but is not mandatory.  Registration and payment of tuition is handled by the Administrative Assistant.  Residents will then receive an email from AIRP regarding case preparation, and are responsible for all aspects of such. 

Dependent upon funding, the department will pay the tuition, as above, but also an accommodation and travel allowance for each resident, unless attending virtually.  Please check with the Administrative Assistant for the amount provided, as this is subject to change each fiscal year.   Residents are required to claim their accommodation and travel via the Expense Reimbursement system (ERS), upon their return.  Please see tab in the Resident Handbook "Reimbursement for Conferences, AIRP & Physics Courses, etc." regarding submitting a travel claim via the ERS. 

Residents should send their assessments to the Program Director, who will confirm attendance and completion of the course.

Diagnostic Radiology Program is offering the opportunity for one resident in their PGY4 year to attend the “ASER Annual Scientific Meeting and Postgraduate Course in Emergency and Trauma Radiology” (or equivalent) course.  The department will cover the cost of registration, as well as travel and accommodations, unless the course is virtual. If no PGY4 can go, we will then ask a PGY3.  Here is the weblink: https://www.aser.org

The Diagnostic Radiology program follows the Postgraduate Medical Education (PGME) office policy for Assessment, Promotion, and Appeals, which can be accessed at the following link: https://meds.queensu.ca/academics/postgraduate/current/policies/apa

This includes the Remediation process as well as the process for the development of a Remediation plan, where needed.

Bracken Library Resources for Health Sciences Research go to:

The Chief Resident creates the call schedule.

For Call Schedule/Changes

Once the Call Schedule has been distributed, the following procedure should be followed for any changes.

1. The Chief Resident creates and revises the schedule.

2. Once the schedule is distributed, residents are to contact the Chief Resident so he/she can make the changes.

3. Please let the Education Assistant (Tammy) know of the changes so that they can be made on the KGH Online Call Schedule during the hours of 7 am to 3 pm from Monday to Friday. If Tammy is away, you can contact the Administrative Assistant (Lynne) before 3 pm.

4. If a change is required after 3 pm or on the weekend, it will be the resident's responsibility to contact both KGH/HDH switchboards, as well as the Imaging Services Department receptionist.

 

 

Foundation of Discipline (FOD) / PGY1 - Transition to Independent Call

PROCESS and EVALUATION:

12 formalized and mandatory “buddy” call shifts will be scheduled prior to starting independent call (~ mid May), predominantly Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursdays in a rotating fashion. Buddy call shifts will run 5 – 10 pm, or when there are no more pages/studies to complete by 930 pm. The senior resident on shift will remain in-house and be across the FOD resident in the reporting room for any questions and to assist/complete cases with the FOD resident has not received formal clinical training in.

 

A CBME evaluation form (EPA F2) will be completed by the senior resident on call after each shift to ensure adequate progression to the next set of shifts. Expectations would be a global rating of “Needs Attention” for Shifts 1-2 and 3-5, “Developing” for Shifts 6-8, and “Achieved” for Shifts 9-12.

 

EXPECTATIONS:

Shifts 1-2 (Block 9): Start in week 2 of Block 9. During shift 2, begin to answer the pager and protocol studies with the CT/US/MR Techs.

 

Shifts 3-5 (Last week of Block 9 and first 2 weeks of Block 10): Answer the pager and protocol studies with the CT/US/MR technologists. During shift 5, begin to interpret studies of the block the resident has completed.

 

More specifically, CT Abdo/Pelvis cases if completed CT during block 9, CT Head cases if completed Neuro during block 9, US cases if completed US during block 9. For the resident who completed US during block 9, also start interpreting cases for modality of their current block in block 10 (given the relative low volume of US on call). For 2019, this would be Dr. Sana Basseri and she would be interpreting Neuro CT Head cases

Shifts 6-8 (Last 2 weeks of Block 10 and first week of Block 11): Answer all pages, protocol all studies and interpret all cases of modalities completed in blocks 9 and 10.

 

Shifts 9-12 (Last 3 weeks of Block 11 and first week of Block 12): “Independent Call” with one weekend evening shift.

 

For the first two independent weekday shifts for each resident, the FOD/PGY1 will buddy up with one another FOD/PGY1 resident from 5 pm-10 pm. For example, if Dr. Joel Kosowan is on call for his first independent call shift on a Monday, Dr. Arvin Haghighat will buddy up with him on Monday. This will rotate through for the first 2 weekday shifts of each FOD/PGY1 resident.

 

For the first weekend shift, there will be a similar buddy up system as above. This will ease the transition to independent call and to further increase exposure to cases prior to independent call.

 

 

The Chief Resident is responsible for submitting stipends to KGH.
Click here

 

The Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada have mandated that all residency training programs across Canada transition to a Competency Based Medical Education (CBME) model over the next several years. Compared with the traditional paradigm of medical education, it is hoped that this new model will help the next generation of learners become better physicians by providing residents with a more flexible training experience, closer supervision, more frequent assessment, better feedback and more mentorship via dedicated academic advisors.

 

Queen's University has decided to embrace this new system, and rather than transitioning several programs annually in a staggered fashion, has decided to launch CBME across all our residency programs concurrently. This enables all our training programs to access the same funding opportunities and faculty development resources, as well as fostering interdisciplinary collaboration.

 

The Queen's Diagnostic Radiology residency program launched CBME on July 1, 2017. All CBME residents will experience a shortened off-service year (8 blocks compared with 13 blocks). Consequently, this allows us to schedule residents for more rotations in diagnostic radiology, including more time allotted for research and elective opportunities. CBME residents are also introduced to on-call earlier on in their training compared to more traditional programs, enhancing learning and fostering greater independence and confidence. Since we have not removed any radiology rotations from the curriculum, we meet or exceed the Royal College training standards to which the traditional radiology residency program is held.

For more information, please go here-> https://meds.queensu.ca/academics/cbme

CBME Faculty Assignments:  

CBME Lead:  Dr. Benjamin Kwan

Academic Advisors Effective July 1, 2022: 

  • Sam Broughton - Umer Nasir
  • Zoe Hu - Danielle Rumbolt
  • Arsalan Rizwan - Maera Haider
  • Shane Natalwalla - Marina Pourafkari
  • Umaseh Sivanesan - Hassan Douis
  • Laura Wong - Emidio Tarulli
  • Katrina Bartellas - Andrea Gallo Hoyos
  • Clay Kurtz - Donatella Tampieri
  • Siddharth Mishra - Johanna Ortiz Jimenez
  • Brendan Phillips - Ian Silver
  • Cyrus Thomas - John Ricketts
  • Nithin Vignesh - Alex Menard
  • Sana Basseri - Rob Dhillon
  • Arvin Haghighat - Christopher Abraham
  • Joel Kosowan - Denise Castro

Competence Committee Members:

  • Ben Kwan
  • Doris Jabs
  • Paul Fenton
  • Andrew Chung 

Roles & Responsibilities for CBME Lead, Academic Advisors & Competence Committee Members:

https://meds.queensu.ca/academics/cbme/role_descriptions

Anatomy

  • Weir J. Imaging Atlas of Human Anatomy, 3rd ed . Mosby, 2003
  • Fleckenstein P, Tranum-Jensen J. Anatomy in Diagnostic Imaging, 2nd ed . Saunders, 2003
  • Netter FH. Atlas of Human Anatomy, 2nd ed . Rittenhouse Book Distributors, 1997.
  • www.e-anatomy.org – excellent website with cross-sectional anatomy labeled slice by slice


General Radiology

  • Brant, WE, Helms, CA, Fundamentals of Diagnostic Radiology, 2nd ed . Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 1999.
  • - Great book. Provides a good foundation when starting out and also a great comprehensive review in senior years (rich in text, few pics). This and the primer are a great place to start


Physics

  • Huda W. Slone RM. Review of Radiological Physics, 2nd ed. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2002. 
    - A must read in preparation for the in-training physics exam and the ABR physics exam (if you write it).
  • Curry III TS, et al. Christensen's Introduction to the Physics of Diagnostic Radiology, 4th ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1990. 
    - I don't own this. I would use it to help explain topics not understood in the physics lectures.
  • Hall EJ. Radiobiology for the Radiologist, 5th ed. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2000. 
    - Never opened it and it didn't seem to negatively affect me. Relevant chapters on radiobiology were provided as part of the physics course notes.
  • Mitchell DG. MRI Principles, 2nd ed. Saunders, 2003. 
    - Phenomenal book. Must read this or the next book on the list at least once if you care to understand MRI physics.
  • McRobbie DW, Moore EA, Graves MJ, Prince MR. MRI: From Picture to Proton. Cambridge University Press, 2003.


Musculoskeletal

  • Manaster BJ, Disler DG, May DA, Sartoris, DJ. Musculoskeletal Imaging: The Requisites, 2nd ed . Mosby, 2002. - Outstanding book. Probably the best of the requisites series.
  • Brower, AC. Arthritis in Black and White, 2nd ed . Saunders, 1996. 
    - Brower is the queen of arthritis. Read this at least twice (and maybe more) over the course of your residency.
  • Helms, CA. Fundamentals of Skeletal Radiology, 2nd ed . Saunders, 1995. 
    - Same content as the chapter in Brant and Helms. 
  • Yu J. Case Review: Musculoskeletal Imaging . Mosby, 2001.
  • Levesque J, et al. A Clinical Guide to Primary Bone Tumors . Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1998. 
    - Written by radiologists, pathologists, and orthopods from Mt. Sinai. A good approach to the often confusing topic of MSK oncology.
  • Resnick D. Bone and Joint Imaging, 2nd ed . Saunders, 1996. 
    - this is the 1200 page "baby" (as opposed to the 6 volume set). Good for reference purposes.
  • Greenspan, A. Orthopedic Radiology: A Practical Approach, 3rd ed . Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2000. 
    - Reference book. You have to understand some orthopedics if you are going to understand MSK radiology.
  • Berquist TH. MRI of the Musculoskeletal System, 4th ed . Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001. 
    - Reference.
  • Kaplan PA, Helms, CA, et al. Musculoskeletal MRI. Saunders, 2001. 
    - Reference.
  • Rogers LF. Radiology of Skeletal Trauma, 3rd ed . Churchill Livingstone, 2002.
    - Reference.
  • Stoller DW. Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Orthopaedics and Sports Medicine, 2nd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1997. - Reference .
  • Freiberger RH, and Kaye JJ, Appleton-Century-Crofts, Arthrography; 1979 out of print, but the only arthrogram book that I know of, find it in the department.
  • Keats TE, A Normal Roentgen Variants That May Simulate Disease; Mosby, 2006.
  • Keats TE, andSmith TH, An Atlas of Normal Developmental Roentgen Anatomy YBMP, 1977
  • Keats TE., Atlas of Roentgenographic Measurement ,YBMP, 2001.
  • Kaplan, Dussault, Helms, Anderson, Major, Musculskeletal MRI:  *Reference Text

 

Chest

  • Goodman LR. Felson's Principles of Chest Roentgenology: A Programmed Text, 2nd ed. Saunders, 1999 
    - Read this once on or before the first day of your first chest rotation.
  • McLoud TC. Thoracic Radiology: the Requisites . Mosby, 1998. 
    - Not the best book, but a good start.
  • Boiselle PM, McLoud TC. Case Review: Thoracic Imaging. Mosby, 2001. 
    - The weakest of the case reviews, but still worth having/reading.
  • Armstrong P, Wilson AG, Dee P, Hansell DM. Imaging of Diseases of the Chest, 2nd ed. Yearbook, 1995. 
    - Comprehensive text on thoracic imaging.
  • Webb WR, Muller NL, Naidich DP. High-Resolution CT of the Lung, 2nd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2001. 
    - These guys are the gurus of HRCT. This is "the" book on the topic with great pictures. For reading as a senior resident.
  • Fraser RS, Colman N, Muller N, Pare PD. Synopsis of Diseases of the Chest, 3rd ed. Saunders, 2005.
  • Muller, Silva. Imaging of the Chest, 2-Volume Set: Expert Radiology Series. 1st ed. 2008. Saunders
  • ACR Learning File online


Computed Tomography

  • Webb, WR, Brant WE, Helms CA. Fundamentals of Body CT , 2nd ed. Saunders, 1998. 
    - A good start. Lee JKT, Sagel SS, Stanley RJ, Heiken JP.
  • Computed Tomography with MRI Correlation, 3rd ed. 
    - Hard for CT books to keep up with the rapidly changing topic. That said - the anatomy and pathology do not change too often so this is a reasonable resource. Do not buy it but maybe read some of it.
  • Fishman EK, Jeffrey Jr RB. Spiral CT: Principles, Techniques and Clinical Applications. Lippincott-Raven, 1998. 
    - Fishman is the guru of MDCT.
  • Lee JKT, Sagel SS, Stanley RJ, Heiken JP. Computed Body Tomography with MRI   Correlation.
  • Federle, Jeffrey,  Desser, 1st ed, Diagnostic Imaging**, Salt Lake City, Utah 2004
  • Case Review Series by Mosby
    • Genitourinary Imaging
    • Abdominal Imaging
  • Abloros, Koenraad Mortele, Sylvester Lee, Vincent Pelsser, CT and MRI of the abdomen and pelvis: A teaching file
  • Haaga, Lanzieri, Gilkeson; CT and MR Imaging of the Whole Body 4th Edition (December 2002).
  • Multimedia - ACR Gastrointestinal CD-ROM (2nd Edition). 


Emergency Radiology

  • Harris JH. Radiology of Emergency Medicine, 4th ed. Lippincott William & Wilkins, 1999.
  • Stern EJ. Trauma Radiology Companion. Lippincott - Raven, 1997
  • R. Brooke Jeffrey; Diagnostic Imaging: Emergency; Amirsys 2007.
  • Jorge A Soto, Brian Lucey; Emergency Radiology: The Requisites; Mosby; 2009.
  • William E Brant; Clyde A Helms; Fundamentals of Diagnostic Radiology; Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 3 edition, 2006.


Gastrointestinal Radiology

  • Schmit, GD. Mayo Clinic Gastrointestinal Imaging Review. Informa Healthcare, 2005. 
    – Excellent review, many rave about this book.
  • Meyers MA. Dynamic Radiology of the Abdomen: Normal and Pathologic Anatomy, 5th ed. Springer, 2000 . 
    - A must read. The standard in terms of peritoneal and retroperitoneal anatomy.
  • Feczko PJ, Halpert RD . Case Review: Gastrointestinal Imaging. Mosby, 2000.
  • Laufer I, Levine M, Lavine MS . Double Contrast Gastrointestinal Radiology, 2nd ed. Saunders, 1992. 
    - Great sections on principles and techniques of double contrast GI radiology. Good pictures.
  • Eisenberg RL. Gastrointestinal Radiology Companion: Imaging Fundamentals. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1999. 
    - Some residents find this very useful.
  • Eisenberg RL. Gastrointestinal Radiology: A Pattern Approach, 2nd ed. Lippincott, 1996.
    - Reference.
  • Halpert RD, Goodman P. Gastrointestinal Radiology: The Requisites. Mosby, 1993. 
    - A little old, a little superficial and a little inaccurate. Read at your own risk.
  • Richard M. Gore, Marc S. Levine ,Textbook of Gastrointestinal Radiology.. Saunders. 3 ed 2007
  • Davis M, Houston JD, Fundamentals of Gastrointestinal Radiology, W.B. Saunders Co., 2002.
  • Halpert RD, Feczko PJ ,Gastrointestinal Radiology: The Requisites, 3rd Edition., Mosby, 2006.
  • Margulis and Burhenne:- Alimentary Tract Radiology, Synopsis (REF) WI 141 M33 1994
  •  ACR teaching file


Genitourinary Radiology

  • Zagoria RJ, Tung GA. Genitourinary Radiology: The Requisites, 2nd ed. Mosby, 2004. 
    - A very good overview of the topic.
  • Tung GA, Zagoria RJ, Mayo-Smith WW. Case Review: Genitourinary Imaging. Mosby, 2000.
  • Davidson AJ, et al. Davidson's Radiology of the Kidney and Genitourinary Tract, 3rd ed. Saunders, 1999. 
    - A big red reference book. Good approach and good pictures.
  • Dunnick NR, Sandler CM, Newhouse JN, Amis Jr. ES. Textbook of Uroradiology, 2nd ed. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 1996.
  • Pollack, H. - Clinical Urography (Saunders).
  • Rumack, Wilson and Charbonneau - Diagnostic Ultrasound.
  • Elkin - Urologic Radiology.
  • Lalli - Tailored Urography (Yearbook Medical Publishers, Inc.).
  • Davidson - Radiology of the Kidney (Saunders).
  • McCallum & Colapinto - Urethrography.
  • Rozin, Samuel - Uterosalpingography in Gynecology (Thomas)
  • Reeder, M. & Felson, B. - Gamuts in Radiology (Audio Visual Radiology of Cincinnati Inc.).

 

A.C.R. GU learning file – CD ROM

 

Mammography

  • Cardenosa G. Breast Imaging (core curriculum series). Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2004 
    - Excellent. All you need.
  • Cardenosa G. Breast Imaging Companion . Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1997.
  • Kopans DB. Breast Imaging, 2nd ed. Lippincott-Raven, 1998.
  • Siegelman ES. Body MRI. Saunders 2005. 
    – Has a good breast MR chapter.
  • American College of Radiology; Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System® (BI-RADS®) Atlas.  2007.                                   
  • Tabar and Dean,Teaching Atlas of Mammography,    
  • ACR Diseases of the Breast:Test & Syllabus, (Second series - No. 36)Feig, Kalisher, Libshitz,Et alCalL  number WN 200P941993 
  •  A Thomas Stavros et al, Breast Ultrasound
  • Elisabeth Morris et al, Breast MRI: Diagnosis and Intervention


Neuroradiology

  • Grossman RI, Youssem DM. Neuroradiology: The Requisites, 2nd ed. Mosby, 2003. 
    - Probably the best single reference. This and the 3 case reviews will get you through Neuro. Some people do not like this book because authors waste space with jokes and weird poems.
  • Bowen BC. Case Review: Spine Imaging. Mosby 2001.
  • Yousem DM. Case Review: Head and Neck Imaging. Mosby 1998.
  • Loevner LA. Case Review: Brain Imaging. Mosby 1999.
  • Osborn AG. Diagnostic Neuroradiology. Mosby, 1994. 
    - An oldie, but a goodie. Getting increasingly dated as time goes on and unfortunately, no new edition will be written. Excellent chapter on vascular anatomy and disease and also appearance of blood on MRI.
  • Castillo M. Neuroradiology Companion: Methods Guidelines and Imaging Fundamentals, 2nd ed. Lippincott-Raven, 1999.
  • Harnsberger HR. Handbook of Head and Neck Imaging, 2nd ed. Mosby 1995 
    - Good for 4th year head and neck rotation
  • Pearse Morris. Practical Neurangiography. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2nd ed. 2006.Ann
  • Osborn. Diagnostic Neuroradiology.
  • Scott W. Atlas. Magnetic Resonance Imaging of the Brain and Spine. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 4th ed. 2008.
  • Anne Osborn, Introduction to Cerebral Angiography.  1991, Harper & Row.
  • Alisa Gean, Imaging of Head Trauma.  , 1994  Press
  • Imaging of the Pediatric Head, Neck and Spine.  M Castillo et al, 1996, Lippincott-Raven Press.
  • . AJ Barkovich, Pediatric Neuroimaging ,995, 2nd Edition Raven Press
  • Nash Harwood, CR. Fitz, Neuroradiology in Infants and Children.  1976, Mosby

 

Nuclear Medicine

  • Thrall JH, Ziessman HA. Nuclear Medicine: The Requisites. Mosby, 1995. 
    - This and the case review are probably all you'll ever need unless you do a nukes fellowship.
  • Zeissman HA, Rehm P. Case Review: Nuclear Medicine. Mosby 2002.
  • Williams SC. Nuclear Medicine on the Internet. Accessible via www.auntminnie.com
    - A really good secondary resource, especially since it's available anywhere you're connected to the internet. Great material on PET imaging.
  • Mettler FA, Guiberteau MJ. Essentials of Nuclear Medicine Imaging, 4th ed. Saunders, 1998. 
    - Much more than you need as a resident. A good reference book.


Pediatric Radiology

  • Donnelly LF. Fundamentals of Pediatric Radiology. Saunders, 2001. 
    - Small soft cover covers the basics and is a reasonably quick read.
  • Blickman JG. Pediatric Radiology: The Requisites, 2nd ed. Mosby, 1997. 
    - Between the above 2 you really get all you need, however neither are very good.
  • Swischuk LE. Imaging of the Newborn, Infant, and Young Child, 4th ed. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 1997. - Reference book.
  • Kuhn JP, Slovis TL, Haller JO. Caffey's Pediatric Diagnostic Imaging,10th ed. Mosby, 2003. 
    - Reference book. No need to buy it because there are multiple copies available to use while at Sick Kids
  • Donald R. Kirks. Practical Pediatric Imaging: Diagnostic Radiology of Infants and Children. 3rd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 1997.
  • Marilyn J. Seigal. Pediatric Sonography. 3nd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2010.
  • Frederic N. Silverman. Caffey's Pediatric X-ray Diagnosis: An Integrated Imaging Approach. Mosby. 1992.
  • A. James BarkovichPediatric Neuroimaging. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2005


Ultrasound

  • Kurtz A, Middleton W. Ultrasound: The Requisites. Mosby, 1996. 
    - Good start for first year rotation. Also has good chapter on OB ultrasound.
  • Middleton WD . Case Review: General and Vascular Ultrasound. Mosby, 2002.
  • Johnson PT, Kurtz AB. Case Review: Obstetric and Gynecologic Ultrasound. Mosby, 2001.
  • Rumack CM, Wilson SR, Charboneau JW. Diagnostic Ultrasound, 3rd ed. Mosby, 2004.
  • Sauerbrei E, Nguyen KT, Nolan RL. A Practical Guide to Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2nd ed. Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 1998.
  • ACR Teaching files on CD ROM,


Interventional Radiology

  • Kaufman JA, Lee MJ. Vascular and Interventional Radiology: The Requisites. Mosby, 2003. 
    - Very good and comprehensive book.
  • Vedantham S, Gould J. Case Review: Vascular and Interventional Imaging. Mosby, 2004. 
    - Great case review.
  • Kandarpa K, Aruny JE. Handbook of Interventional Radiologic Procedures, 3rd ed. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2002. 
    - Good overview of technical aspects of interventional procedures. Definitely borrow it if you can, and buy it if you plan to do interventional radiology in fellowship or practice.
  • Valji K. Vascular and Interventional Radiology. Saunders, 1999. 
    - Comprehensive, but more detail than you need during residency.
  • LaBerge JM. Interventional Radiology Essentials. Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2000. 
    - Mediocre. Stick with the requisites. Some people love this but you would know better.
  • Funaki.  Teaching Atlas of Vascular & Non-Vascular Interventional Radiology.  Thieme Medical Publishers. 2007.
  • Baum S. Pentecost M. Abrams’ Angiography: Interventional Radiology 2nd edition, Lippincott William and Wilkins. 2006 ISBN 0781740894


Body MRI

  • Siegelman ES. Body MRI. Saunders 2005. 
    - Great book for 4th year body MRI rotation(s).
  • Richard C. Semelka.Abdominal-Pelvic MRI. Wiley. 3rd ed. 2009.
  • Clinical Magnetic Resonance Imaging. Edelman, Hesselink, Zlatkin latest edition Saunders.


Cardiac

  • Stephen W. Miller, Suhny Abbara. Cardiac Radiology: The Requisites. Mosby. 3rd ed. 2009.


ENT

  • Shankhar, Khan, Cheung. Head & Neck Imaging.
  • Harnsberger. Handbook of Head & Neck Imaging.
  • Reference: Som, Curtin. Head & Neck Imaging
  • Som & Bergeron. Imaging of the head and neck
  • Harnsberger, Handbook in Radiology: Head and Neck Imaging.2nd Edition, Radiology Clinics of  North America.
  • G. Dodd and B. Jing ,Radiology of the Nose, Paranasal Sinuses and Nasopharyns.  .

 OBS Ultrasound

  • ACR online lectures.
  • Callen.,Ultrasonography in Obstetrics and Gynecology. A Saunders, 5th ed. 2007
  • Rumack & Wilson.,Diagnostic Ultrasound, Vol II.
  • Doubilet, Benson.  Atlas of Ultrasound in Obstetrics and Gynecology,Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2nd ed. 2003
  • Reuter, Babagbemi. Obstetric and Gynecologic Ultrasound: A Case Review Series. Mosby.  2nd ed. 2006.

During the course of the semester we will be reading, presenting, “writing”, and critically evaluating journal articles (We will write our term papers as if we were writing a journal article, but with a modified Methods section and without the Results section). Below is a checklist that follows closely the format of a scientific report, conventionally divided into 6 sections. Please use the checklist as a reference for your a) term paper, b) peer review, AND c) as a guide when reading journal articles in general.

  1. Abstract

The abstract serves as a summary of the paper, presenting the purpose, scope, and major findings.  The title & abstract are often all that people will read, using this information to decide whether they want to continue. What did you do? What are the main results? What are your conclusions?

a) Is the abstract intelligible?  Does it…

b) …accurately describe the objectives & results of paper?

c) …include data not presented in the paper?

d) …include material that cannot be substantiated (conclusions unsupported by results)?

 

  1. Introduction

The introduction serves to logically present the background information/provide context for the study. 

What is the question (research/scientific hypothesis)? Why is it important (rationale & justification)? What are the alternative hypotheses & how do you test among them (statistical hypotheses)? Remember that a lot of studies begin by observing a pattern (correlation/association). Your research hypothesis states an explanation for this pattern (story), and a statistical hypothesis determines the generalities of the pattern. Hence, we test our predictions (statistical hypotheses) using statistical tests & use results of these tests to either support or refute the research hypothesis.

a) Did the authors indicate why the study was undertaken?

b) Was the background information adequate to understand the aims & objectives of  

     the study?

 

  1. Methods

The methods section should be a clear & succinctly stated, chronological description of what you did & how you did it.  Could someone else repeat the research with the information provided?  If the answer is “no,” your methods section is incomplete.

a) Were methods described in sufficient detail for others to repeat or extend the study?

b) Were adequate references cited if standard methods were used?

c) If methods were modified, were modifications described carefully?

d) Have the authors indicated why particular procedures were used, the potential problems of the methods used, & limitations of their methods?

e) Have the authors specified the statistical procedures used?

f) Are the statistical methods appropriate?

 

  1. Results

The results section is meant to highlight trends in the data (most often presented in figures and/or tables). Text should compliment the tables/figures, NOT repeat the information presented therein.

a) Are the results appropriate for the stated objectives?

b) Do the results make sense?

c) Do tables & figures clearly describe the data?

d) Have the appropriate statistical analyses been performed on the data?

 

  1. Discussion

Use this section to synthesize your results & to tie your results to the literature.

Do not repeat your results…relate them to other studies. What are the potential explanations for the results? Have other studies come to similar/different conclusions? How do you account for those discrepancies? WHAT is the take home message? WHAT is the “so what” about your work? Remember your scope of inference (don’t stretch your results too far). For example, if you sampled one species of lizard from a single county in Arizona, results do not apply to all lizards in North America.

a) Were the objectives of the study met? If not, do authors have an explanation as to

    why?

b) Were statistical hypotheses clearly supported or refuted?

c) Are results discussed in relation to similar studies?

d) Do authors indulge in needless speculation?

e) If results are statistically significant, are they also biologically significant?

f) Do authors adequately interpret their data & discuss the limitations of their study?

  1. References

a) Do authors cite appropriate papers for comments made?

b) Do authors cite their own publications needlessly?

Use the format of Journal of Physiology (http://jp.physoc.org/) for your list of references, as well as for the parenthetical notation throughout your paper. Try to find recent references (within the last 2 or 3 years) so that your analysis is up to date.

 

Elective blocks are scheduled by the Program, but it is the resident's responsibility to arrange their choice of elective.

Off-Site:  
With the approval of the Program Director provided established guidelines are followed.  Arrangements to be made 4-6 months in advance of the elective period.   

On-Site:  
Arrangements to be made 2-3 months in advance of the elective period.

• The forms are by the door in the resident’s room in an Orange folder.

• Residents are responsible for gettting the FORM 1 filled out. 

• The Cardiac Fellow is the contact for the Radiology Resident to clear the
   pacemaker/Loop recorder.

• The Cardiac Fellow is also responsible for organizing the device
  adjustments and nursing availability for the scan.

• The Radiology Resident can page the Cardiac Fellow through
   switchboard.

• Forms 1 and 3 must be signed off by the Cardiac Fellow.

• Scanning to take place on the nights or weekends require FORM 1 and
  FORM 3 to be filled out and signed off before the technologist is called.

Residents can trigger faculty evaluations, at any time, for a radiologist.  

Here is the link to the instructions: 

 

Please choose the form called "Preceptor - Dept of Diagnostic Radiology."

 

These are collated once/year, for the previous calendar year, in February.  They are reviewed by the Program Director and Head, and then distributed to the radiologists.  A reminder that these evaluations are anonymous.  

Please note that, for all rotations, the resident work hours are from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. 

Effective August 2020, Dr. Chung added all Goals & Objectives to OneDrive/Sharepoint, accessible via Queen's email/NetID and his link was emailed to all residents, or is provided to all new residents at the start of their residency.  It contains the Goals & Objectives for all rotations.

A three (3) block mandatory Pediatric Radiology rotation at the Hospital for Sick Children (HSC) is scheduled in the PGY-4 year. Link to more information RE: Regional Education Office Accommodation for Sick Kids rotation

As per information in the link above, accommodation is provided by the Faculty of Health leased condominium, which is conveniently located near Hospital for Sick Children.  The Regional Education Office at FHS will contact the resident, via email, regarding the booking of this condo.  If the condo is not available, the resident is to arrange their own accommodation, and receives reimbursement for this. Please see the Administrative Assistant regarding the amount of funding, as this is subject to change each fiscal year.

For the call schedule while at HSC, your contact information is provided to HSC by the Administrative Assistant.  HSC will then contact the resident with further information.

All residents must complete the University of Toronto registration process, which can be found here: https://electives.pgme.utoronto.ca/pgme/electives/index.cfm. This is the resident's responsiblity.

Residents’ on-call stipends, while at HSC, continue to be submitted to KGH, via the Chief Resident.

Vacation is allowed during these three blocks.  However, Sick Kids has requested that, if avoidable, please do not book time off during your first week, since this is when orientation and training is completed.  It takes a few days before you are provided with EMR (EPIC) accounts, which are required for call.  You are also allowed to book off additional time to attend educational events,  ie: a Visiting Professor in Kingston, a review course, exams, etc. Requests for time off during the Pediatric rotation will be requested in advance and submitted to the coordinator in Diagnostic Imaging at the Hospital for Sick Children, via email, and copied to the Queen's Educational Assistant. (ie: Tammy Kearney, tlk@queensu.ca)  Please ask the Administrative Assistant for the Sick Kids Program Assistant's contact information, as this is subject to change.

American College of Radiology (ACR) Exam

During your PGY2- 5 year, you will write the American College of Radiology (DXIT) exam.  This exam is mandatory and is done virtually 

Mock OSCE Exam 

  • PGY2s partake in a pre-call exam, each Fall
  • All residents participate in a Mock OSCE each spring

Most journal articles are available electronically via the Queen's Library, however, if you are unable to locate a journal article, the Educational Assistant can retrieve this for you with appropriate information provided to him/her (i.e. name of journal, date, title). Also, if journal articles are not available from Queen’s University Libraries, we can order articles electronically via Inter-Library Loan.  The Department covers the cost of this service as long as it pertains to your research project(s).

During the course of the semester we will be reading, presenting, “writing”, and critically evaluating journal articles (We will write our term papers as if we were writing a journal article, but with a modified Methods section and without the Results section). Below is a checklist that follows closely the format of a scientific report, conventionally divided into 6 sections. Please use the checklist as a reference for your a) term paper, b) peer review, AND c) as a guide when reading journal articles in general. 

Abstract

The abstract serves as a summary of the paper, presenting the purpose, scope, and major findings.  The title & abstract are often all that people will read, using this information to decide whether they want to continue. What did you do? What are the main results? What are your conclusions?

a) Is the abstract intelligible?  Does it…

b) …accurately describe the objectives & results of paper?

c) …include data not presented in the paper?

d) …include material that cannot be substantiated (conclusions unsupported by results)?

Introduction

The introduction serves to logically present the background information/provide context for the study. 

What is the question (research/scientific hypothesis)? Why is it important (rationale & justification)? What are the alternative hypotheses & how do you test among them (statistical hypotheses)? Remember that a lot of studies begin by observing a pattern (correlation/association). Your research hypothesis states an explanation for this pattern (story), and a statistical hypothesis determines the generalities of the pattern. Hence, we test our predictions (statistical hypotheses) using statistical tests & use results of these tests to either support or refute the research hypothesis.

a) Did the authors indicate why the study was undertaken?

b) Was the background information adequate to understand the aims & objectives of  

     the study?

Methods

The methods section should be a clear & succinctly stated, chronological description of what you did & how you did it.  Could someone else repeat the research with the information provided?  If the answer is “no,” your methods section is incomplete.

a) Were methods described in sufficient detail for others to repeat or extend the study?

b) Were adequate references cited if standard methods were used?

c) If methods were modified, were modifications described carefully?

d) Have the authors indicated why particular procedures were used, the potential problems of the methods used, & limitations of their methods?

e) Have the authors specified the statistical procedures used?

f) Are the statistical methods appropriate?

Results

The results section is meant to highlight trends in the data (most often presented in figures and/or tables). Text should compliment the tables/figures, NOT repeat the information presented therein.

a) Are the results appropriate for the stated objectives?

b) Do the results make sense?

c) Do tables & figures clearly describe the data?

d) Have the appropriate statistical analyses been performed on the data?

Discussion

Use this section to synthesize your results & to tie your results to the literature.

Do not repeat your results…relate them to other studies. What are the potential explanations for the results? Have other studies come to similar/different conclusions? How do you account for those discrepancies? WHAT is the take home message? WHAT is the “so what” about your work? Remember your scope of inference (don’t stretch your results too far). For example, if you sampled one species of lizard from a single county in Arizona, results do not apply to all lizards in North America.

a) Were the objectives of the study met? If not, do authors have an explanation as to

    why?

b) Were statistical hypotheses clearly supported or refuted?

c) Are results discussed in relation to similar studies?

d) Do authors indulge in needless speculation?

e) If results are statistically significant, are they also biologically significant?

f) Do authors adequately interpret their data & discuss the limitations of their study?

References

a) Do authors cite appropriate papers for comments made?

b) Do authors cite their own publications needlessly?

Use the format of Journal of Physiology (http://jp.physoc.org/) for your list of references, as well as for the parenthetical notation throughout your paper. Try to find recent references (within the last 2 or 3 years) so that your analysis is up to date.

Terms of Reference

  • Objective:
    To encourage and incorporate critical thinking skills in the evaluation of radiology literature.
  • Process:
    To read, present and critically evaluate selected journal articles­­.
  • Articles:
    One article
    to be provided by the selected radiologist. The Program will distribute the article, and any supplemental material provided, to the residents.
  • Frequency:Two times per academic year, from September to March.
  • Staff Selection:
    To be selected by the Program on a rotating schedule
  • Resident Selection:
    To be selected by the Program, on a rotating schedule, and to be assigned the following sections of the article to be critically evaluated (see below). Alternatively, the assigned radiologist can determine the selection of residents and sections to be evaluated
    1. Introduction / Background
    2. Patients and Method
    3. Results
    4. Discussion / Conclusion
      The Program will provide the residents material to assist them in the critical evaluation process. Resident attendance is mandatory, and will be recorded.
  • Venue:
    KGH Conference Room - Tuesdays at 12:00 pm
  • Funding:
    The Program will provide food and non-alcoholic beverages for the rounds.

At KGH, in Radiology Residents Reporting Area (next to the Educational Assistant’s Office).  If you would like to claim a locker, please see the Program Assistant for a magnetic label and a dry erase marker so that we can label it with your initials. 

At HDH, contact Halina Weatherdon.

Your mailbox is located in the head's secretary's office (Room 22-2-214). Although information is mostly distributed to you via email (so be sure to check it as RSVPs are often required), you should still check your mailbox frequently.

EMERGENCY BOOKING FOR PACEMAKERS AND LOOP RECORDERS


• Residents are responsible for getting the FORM 1 filled out.

• The forms are by the door in the resident’s room in an Orange folder.

• The Cardiac Fellow is the contact for the Radiology Resident to clear the
   pacemaker/Loop recorder.

• The Cardiac Fellow is also responsible for organizing the device
  adjustments and nursing availability for the scan.

• The Radiology Resident can page the Cardiac Fellow through
   switchboard.

• Forms 1 and 3 must be signed off by the Cardiac Fellow.

• Scanning to take place on the nights or weekends require FORM 1 and
  FORM 3 to be filled out and signed off before the technologist is called.

Radiology Residents' Orientation for MRI

 

We currently have 2 MRI machines at KHSC. A 1.5 Tesla Siemens Avanto and 3 Tesla Siemens VIDA.

The current hours of operation are from 6AM to 1030pm during weekdays, and from 8AM to 4PM during weekends. These hours change depending on staff or during holidays.

Outside these hours an MR technologist is ON CALL for specific MR emergencies that cannot wait to be done during normal hours.

MRI techs ext. 2796

MRI tech on call pager #650-3661

MRI Charge Shelley ext 7808

The MRI machine is always in high demand and most of the scans that are done during the day are booked/scheduled Outpatients.

There are allocated “open time slots” every day (including weekends) for Inpatients and Emergencies.

During the day all scans are coded by a staff radiologist, who also determines if an injection of gadolinium is necessary.  The standard dose of gadolinium is 0.1ml/kg. 

The radiologist also determines the urgency of the MR scan based on a 1 to 4 scale.

#1 meaning 24 hours, #2 in 48 hours, #3 10 days, #4 Beyond 10 days

The MR techs will get inpatients scanned according to the urgency score and available open time.

In the evening when taking over for the day Radiologist, it’s a good practice to check in with the techs and they will let you know if there are any emergencies or pending Inpatient exams.

MRI booking clerks are in charge of scheduling all the Outpatients including outpatient emergencies or referrals from other centers.

 

MRI bookings ext. 2786 

MRI protocols are arranged by anatomy and/or specialty as follows:

Neuro:

  • Brain
  • Spine
  • Neck soft tissue
  • Brachial, lumbar plexus
  • MRI angiography of brain, spine, neck

Body:

  • Abdomen (liver, pancreas, kidneys, adrenals, spleen)
  • Pelvis based on female or male anatomy
  • Enterography
  • Rad check cases
  • MR angiography of abdominal vessels

MSK:

  • Individual joints and certain bilateral studies
  • Long bone/extremities
  • MSK pelvis
  • Peripheral runoff

Chest:

  • Cardiac MRI
  • Chest soft tissue
  • MR angiography of Aorta and thoracic vessels

Breast:

  • MR Breasts routine or implants
  • MR Breast biopsy

Vascular:

  • MR angiography of various anatomy

 

For queries and/or a detailed list of the MR protocols please contact the Senior MRI tech, Tudor Chibacu or Charge Tech, Shelley Cabral

MRI scans in general tend to be a lot longer than a CT exam. This is primarily due to the way MRI images are acquired but also patient preparation plays a big role in the total duration of an MRI scan. There is of course the screening of the patient, clearing of all implants (if present). Patient needs to change, remove all jewellery  and metal accessories. If monitored they will be switched to an MRI safe monitor.

 A few examples of estimated scan times (the duration of the actual MRI exam, excluding patient preparation) at KGH:

DWI brain only – 10 min

Tumor brain – 30 min

Cauda equina (L-spine) – 20 min

Trauma spine (one region, non Gado) – 30 min

Whole spine routine (Cord Compression) – 45 min

Whole spine with Gado (infection, tumor) – 75 min

MRCP – 30 min

Cardiac MRI (Gado) – 60+ min

 

Major MR safety concerns

Cardiac pacemakers, ICD’s or Loop Recorders.

Even if MRI conditional, these types of devices and their attachments still need to be checked by the Device Clinic for MRI compatibility.

In the case of pacemakers, the patient will need complete monitoring during the MRI exam and therefore can only be scanned mon-fri 8-4pm (cardiac device clinic hours of operation)

Aneurysm Clips

We require the make and model of the clip in every case, no matter what type of scan or body part  the patient is having scanned. 

Otologic Implants

Make and model of the implant needs to be provided

Genital Prosthesis

Make and model is needed if penile prosthetic

Electronic or programmable implanted devices

Make and model for all Programmable valves, Neurostimulators, Pumps, etc.      

 

MRI CALL CHECKLIST

  1. Do you have a requisition?  Before calling the MR technologist you should have a properly filled out requisition. Do not approve an MRI without a complete requisition.    
  1. Is the patient location clearly identified on the requisition?   If the patient is in the hospital make sure you know what floor or service. If the patient is a referral you need to find out how they will get here and when.
  1. Is the patient competent to be screened?  If not, is there a Power of Attorney or substitute decision maker that can answer the MR screening questions
  1. Is the patient intubated?  If yes, has the Respiratory Therapist been contacted and available to accompany the patient?
  1. Does the patient have any metal or electronic implants?  If yes, the service needs to provide the type, location, manufacturer and age of implant. If this information is not available, the study will not be performed.
  1. Does the patient require foreign body orbit x-rays?  If yes, the orbit films need to be ordered and reviewed, or alternatively, review of a recent CT head
  1. Is the patient capable of holding still for the duration of the MRI scan?  The service must provide proper sedation and/or pain management.
  1. Does the patient require a nurse to be present?
  1. Is the Patient an Inmate?  If yes, 3 guards are required to be present for the duration of the MRI with 1 of the guards having no weapons/guns (unarmed) and able to enter the MRI Magnet room (zone 4) for the safety of the Technologist and Everyone involved.
  1. Does the Patient have a Cardiac device? if yes, Cardiology on call must be consulted and able to clear, screen, test and program the device into MRI safe mode pre and post MRI. Cardiac monitoring is required and a nurse/RACE team must be present for the complete duration of the MRI. If alternative imaging is possible please consider this first. (Internal Loop Recorders are excluded from this process as they do not require engagement of cardiology as no programming is required.) 

The following is a Kingston General Hospital Policy: 

Principle

Due to health concerns arising from exposure to scented products, the organization has instituted a scent-free policy in an effort to provide a healthy and safe working, learning, teaching, and caring environment for staff, students, patients, and visitors alike. 

We care for and work with many individuals with life long illnesses who can experience significant negative health effects when exposed to fragranced products. We will endeavour to accommodate the health needs of scent-sensitive individuals in our environment.


Applicability

All persons who work in, attend as patients of, or visit Kingston General Hospital, have an obligation to help maintain a scent-free environment.

 

Policy

  1. All staff, patients, and visitors will: Refrain from wearing cologne, perfume, scented personal care products such as body lotions, sprays, and powders, scented deodorant and hair care products, and aftershave lotions;  avoid bringing in scented flowers including but not limited to: Freesias, Lilacs, lavenders, lilies (including day, tiger, Easter Lilies, lily of the valley, and star gazers), Hyacinth and Peonies; refrain from bringing scented air fresheners or personal hand lotions from home. Fragrance –free hand lotions are available at the hospital.
  2. Staff will advise all persons entering the hospital about the scent-free policy and educate all persons entering the facility about the health effects of scented products.
  3. Patients who are wearing scented products may be asked to wash and/or change their clothing.
  4. Visitors who wear scented products will be asked to leave. Security will be involved as needed. 
  5. Staff who are wearing scented products may be asked to leave the area, wash, and/or change their clothing. 
  6. Staff who show disregard for the scent-free policy will face appropriate disciplinary action.
  7. Suppliers will be notified of our policy and our mandate to purchase scent free products wherever possible.
  8. The public will be advised of our policy through the media, and other venues such as appointment requisitions, and scent free signage posted throughout the hospital.

Most pediatric UGI studies can be performed on a non-urgent basis. 

Emergent UGI studies are primarily related to a concern of malrotation. The staff radiologist needs to be consulted and aware of the procedure. These cases are often present within the first few weeks of life. In these cases, and with all cases where there is a concern of potential aspiration, a non/iso-osmolar contrast agent should be used as opposed to a barium preparation. 

Patients presenting acutely with a high level of suspicion for malrotation should be accompanied with, and monitored by, a pediatric nurse with a resident and/or staff present and they should have a NG tube in place. If the stomach is gas distended, despite the NG tube, then aspiration of the gas should be performed prior to contrast injection.  The patient should be placed on their right side and the iso-osmolar contrast (usually 1-2 ml) is injected via the NG tube during fluoroscopy. The duodenum should be noted in a normal posterior direction in the lateral view. When the contrast is seen entering the duodenum the patient should be turned on their back and an image of the DJ flexure obtained.

Other urgent requests, such as query foreign body, esophageal stricture, etc. need to be at the discretion of the radiology staff on call and will be dependent on the history, patient status, and whether there is the potential for an urgent change in management.

 

Memo - Coverage of Evenings & Weekends in US

 

TECHNOLOGIST PRESENT

NEED:

  • Patient name and CR #
  • Patient location
  • Examination requested
  • Requisition sent

NOTIFY ultrasound technologist ASAP (phone or leave a note in the ultrasound office).  The sooner the request is known, the sooner the exam can be completed.

AFTER HOURS – NO TECHNOLOGIST

  1. Cases to be done the following day –  PLEASE DO NOT GIVE APPOINTMENT TIMES TO ER OR TO THE PATIENT :
  • Weekdays – bookings clerk available – Have requisition sent and prioritize for the      bookings person.
  • Weekends – Leave a handover note for the technologist (with the needed information from above) letting the services know if there is no requisition the ultrasound cannot be done. Also, let radiology resident who will be covering know.
  1. Urgent Scans:
  • Room 5 is always unlocked.
  • If patient ordered and accessioned, use scheduler (if not ordered manually, input patients name, DOB, and CR#).
  • When examination is completed, fill out the downtime sheets and leave at the front desk.
  • Always SHUT DOWN machines, not Standby.

 If you have any questions regarding the ultrasound machines, protocols, etc., please just ask any of the sonographers.

The On-Call Room is located beside the Educational Assistant’s Office in the former (small) Residents Reporting Room.

This room has a key pad on the door and the code must not be given out.  Extra linen/blankets are kept in this room but please call Environmental Services if you require restocking.

The department currently has subscriptions to the following online resources, for all residents:

  • RadPrimer (renewed every fall and Administrative Assistant sends PGY1s their log-in information)
  • STATdx (renewed every fall and Administrative Assistant sends PGY1s their log-in information)
  • E-Anatomy https://www.imaios.com/en/e-Anatomy (renewed every July.  Currently provided by CAR as part of CAR membership paid by the program) 

Each year, when these subscriptions are paid and renewed the PGY1 residents will receive an email, regarding their username/password. 

Please contact the Program Assistant, who is responsible for all aspects of administering these subscriptions.

 

QGenda is used for the Radiologists' weekly clinical work schedule. The link is sent to the residents before their first rotation in the department.

For all travel, the residents are to complete a travel claim upon return, and submit it to the Program Assistant for approval, via the Expense Reimbursement System (ERS).  Go to this link and then scroll down to ERS and log in:

https://my.queensu.ca/

For instructions on how to complete expense claims, go to this website and scroll down to Expense Claims, and you will see PDF  document entitled "Expense Report, How to Create"

https://www.queensu.ca/financialservices/publications-policies-procedures/travel-expense

Conferences:

Residents are eligible to receive reimbursement for registration, travel and accommodation, in order to attend one conference, if they are presenting, during their residency.  Please see the Program Assistant for the amounts, since these are subject to change each fiscal year.  The resident is responsible for booking all aspects of this, and must submit all original receipts.

Physics:

Physics courses are offered by different institutions every year.  It is the resident’s responsibility to choose which courses they wish to attend, if any, register, arrange travel, accommodation, etc.   Residents are not required to take vacation time and are eligible for reimbursement for registration, travel and accommodation for one physics courses, maximum $1800, but can submit a request to attend a subsequent course, via the RPC.  The departmental policy is that no course can be repeated, but the Huda physics course is an exception (as per STC June 11, 2014).  The resident must submit all original receipts by completing a travel expense claim via the Expense Reimbursement System (ERS), as per instructions above. 

 

 

Bracken Library Resources for Health Sciences Research go to:

 

The Clinical Research Centre:

 

Cochrane - A global independent network of researchers, professionals, patients, carers, and people interested in health.

There are some CDs, DVDs and books stored in the Educational Secretary’s office.  These are to be signed out with him/her.

  • The loan period is four weeks maximum.  Books are to be used by Radiology personnel only.  Out of courtesy to fellow residents, it is recommended that books be returned promptly to allow someone else on a similar rotation to sign them out.
  • When returning an item to the library, it should be given to the Educational Assistant for sign in. 
  • Books are not to be transferred from one resident to another without proper sign in/sign out procedures being followed.
  • Like any library, if you lose any items, you are required to replace them.

Please note:  Residents now have online access to RadPrimer, StatDx and E-Anatomy, and all tasks related to those subscriptions are administered by the Program Assistant (Please see the section entitled "Online Radiology Resources").  

The Objectives of Training and Specialty Training Requirements in Diagnostic Radiology (2014 – ver 1.0) state that residents who begin their training on or after July 1, 2014 will be required to have completed a “quality improvement or hypothesis-based research project relevant to Diagnostic Radiology” in order to be Royal College certified.

The department will sponsor each resident for one conference poster/paper presentation in the four years of training (dependent upon funding available).  If you require funding for an additional presentation, you can make your request to the Residency Program Committee through the Administrative Assistant.   If funding is available, you are to submit claim via the ERS.  Please see the section entitled "Reimbursement for Conferences, AIRP & Physics Courses." 

Research Meeting Minutes and Guideline 

Residents share documents via the KGH Shared Network Drive.  Here are instructions on how to map this file network drive so it shows up in “My Computer”

  • Open “My Computer”
  • Go to tools and select “Map Network Drive
  • Choose a Drive letter you like and in the folder dropdown list paste: kghdataclusterimaging services$, then select “finish”

ScrubEx Dispenser

The hospital has two ScrubEx dispensers where you can access scrubs when necessary located on Connell 2 and Connell 5.

Your KGH ID badge will be programed to provide you with access to the machines for use when needed. In order to ensure your badge is programmed properly you need to complete a form which can be obtained from Kelly Hubbard, Manager of KGH Imaging Services.

Once the form is completed it needs to be taken to Brenda in Environmental Services (Watkins 1, Room 4-1-220-0) who will process the form and ensure your access is provided as necessary.

Note: Those requiring scrubs must provide a damage deposit of $60 ($30 per set) payable at the Cashier’s Office located on Davies 1 at KGH site or at Cashier’s Office on Jeanne Mance 6.

Scrub Distribution and Collection Policy

Kingston Health Sciences Centre

ADMINISTRATIVE POLICY MANUAL

Subject: Linen Services – Scrub Distribution and Collection Number: 04-081

Issued by: President and Chief Executive Officer Page: 2 of 3

Original Issue: 2018.05

Revised: NEW

Introduction

Scrubs are required protective clothing intended to minimize cross-contamination and are designed to promote a clean environment in the interest of Infection Control and Patient Safety. The wearing of scrubs does not eliminate the need for PPE. Proper PPE must be worn when there is any risk of blood or bodily fluid exposure.

Scrubs inventory is managed through site-specific Linen Services departments. These scrubs are accessible through dispensing machines at both the KGH and HDH Sites in designated areas. Enforcement of this policy is the responsibility of each department, unit or program.

Policy

Kingston Health Sciences Centre will provide hospital issued scrubs to physicians, students, and hospital employees who require them for their work.

1. Scrubs will be made available to designated staff and learners working in the following areas only:

a. Operating Rooms (OR’s) (Both Sites)

b. PACU (Both Sites)

c. Labour and Delivery (KGH site only)

d. NICU (KGH site only)

e. Cardio Vascular Lab (KGH site only)

f. IVR Lab (KGH site only)

g. Central Processing (Both Sites)

h. Pharmacy Compounding Areas (Both Sites)

i. Endoscopy Suites (Both Sites)

j. Cystoscopy Unit/Urology Treatment Clinic (HDH site only)

k. Mohs Micrographic Surgery (HDH site only)

l. Emergency/ Urgent care (Both Sites)

m. Chronic Pain Clinic - Fluoroscopy Procedural Suite (HDH Only)

n. Autopsy and Pathology (KGH site only)

o. Other approved areas

2. In accordance with best practices in Infection Control, hospital issued scrubs (either OR Scrubs or Regular Scrubs)

a. Are never to be worn outside the Hospital.

b. Must be changed at least daily

c. Must be returned at the end of each shift for proper laundering

d. Are never to be taken home for laundering

e. Are not to be removed from the hospital premises at any time

 

3. OR scrubs worn during dirty or contaminated cases should be changed prior to subsequent cases even if not visibly soiled

4. Visibly soiled OR scrubs are not to be worn outside the Operating Rooms at any time.

5. OR scrubs should not be worn in the hospital facility outside of the Patient Care or Physician’s Office areas. Soiled scrubs should be changed as soon as feasible following a surgical procedure.

6. In the Operating Rooms, only hospital approved scrubs are to be worn. Personal Scrubs are not permitted.

Procedure

Note: This procedure will be implemented at HDH site only upon installation of scrub dispensing equipment

1. New employees, students, residents or staff members requiring scrubs must:

a. Complete the Scrub Access Request Form

b. Have the form authorized by the Director or designate for the area in which you will be working (See Point #1 in policy Section).

c. Provide a damage deposit of $60 ($30 per set) payable at the Cashier’s Office located on Davies 1 at KGH site or at Cashier’s Office on Jeanne Mance 6. Attending Physicians and Front Line Hospital Employees governed by a Collective Agreement will have the deposit requirement waived

d. Present the form with authorizing signature and cashier’s receipt in person at the Environmental and Transportation Services office on Watkins 1 Room 4-1-220-0 (KGH) or Johnson 0 Room J0-014 (HDH) between 08:00 and 15:00

e. Damage deposits will be returned by cheque upon verifying all scrubs have been returned and scrub access has been terminated

2. Forms without an authorized signature or without a cashiers receipt will not be processed.

3. Access to the scrub dispensing machines will be granted by the Secretary, Environmental and Transportation Services or designate. Each user will receive credits which will give them access to two sets (Top and Bottom) in their requested size. Any requests for exceptions to the number of sets must be submitted in writing and approved by the Director of Environmental and Transportation Services.

4. Those who are unable to fit any of the available scrub sizes should contact the Secretary, Environmental and Transportation Services to discuss options. Pants should not be worn long enough that cuffs are being walked on (posing infection control and occupational health and safety hazards).

5. Scrubs must be returned at the end of each shift. Unreturned scrubs will result in forfeit of the damage deposit

6. Additional scrub credits or access to scrubs may be authorized for any employee, visitor or staff member in an urgent situation by contacting the Secretary, Environmental and Transportation Services during regular hours, or by contacting an Environmental Services Supervisor through the call centre at extension 7250. These “emergency scrubs” must be returned at the next earliest opportunity.

7. Substituting other items (such as towels or gowns etc) for scrubs in order to retrieve additional credits is deemed as misuse. Individuals doing so will have their credits adjusted and their program manager will be notified for appropriate follow up. Credits will be reinstated once all missing scrubs have been returned in person to the Secretary, Environmental and Transportation Services during regular hours.

8. Violation of any part of this policy or other misuse of the Scrub Dispensing System may result in disciplinary action and/or cancellation of access.

Authorizing Signature:

_________________________________

Dr. David Pichora

President and Chief Executive Officer

 

Vacation, Professional/Educational Leave, Exam Leave:  See PARO policy.

  • Time off is to be requested formally by e-mailing the Educational Assistant
  • Requests are to be submitted at least four weeks in advance of requested time off.   Requests received with less than four weeks' notice will require the approval of the Program Director.

 

Sick Time or Medical Appointments:

  • Call the front desk of the hospital you are working at so the receptionist can post it on the board which will notify the other front desk staff of your absence.
  • Tell the receptionist who to notify (radiologists, perhaps technologists, etc.), or you can notify those people yourself.
  • You must notify the Educational Assistant, via email or voice mail, as early as possible, for record-keeping purposes. 

Residents sometime require letters to verify that they are residents (students) at Queen’s.  
These letters are available via logging into SOLUS and follow the steps below:

1) Go to https://my.queensu.ca

2) Click the SOLUS tab in the upper right corner

3) Under the ACADEMICS section, go to the pick list and select “Enrollment Verification”

4) From here, click retrieve to get a PDF.

 It will not work in Safari on a Mac, use Firefox.

Visiting Professor

Dr. Jean Seely - Breast Imaging, Professor - University Ottawa Tuesday, November 15, 2022 Virtual Sessions

 

For the residency training program, the Administrative Assistant (Queen's):  Coordinates all aspects of the Diagnostic Radiology Residency Training Program, as well as the financial tasks related to it.

Educational Assistant (Queen's):  Deals with the following related to the Department of Diagnostic Radiology Residency Training: 

  • Tasks related to research and research committee meetings
  • Schedules grand rounds, noon and ultrasound rounds, all academic half day lectures, including staff lectures, survival rounds, and journal clubs
  • Books Visiting Professors three times/year
  • Types, as required, academic only related material for the Radiology Residents
  • Types, as required, letters of reference by radiologists for residents seeking fellowship/job positions.  Please note: The Educational Assistant does not complete and/or mail applications for fellowship positions.
  • Other tasks delegated by the Administrative Assistant.